Color Blocking in Interior Design

Color Blocking in Interior Design

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There are times when fashion inspires interior design. And color blocking is one fashion trend that all fashion conscious people have heard of. It is all about fusing opposite colors and pairing them thus, creating new unexpected, interesting combinations. Many, credit color blocking to the Dutch artist Piet Mondrian, who created compositions with square blocks of the primary colors, in juxtaposition to white blocks, separated by flat black lines. His works became an inspiration source to Yves Saint Laurent, among other fashion designers, who at some point designed dresses that matched Mondrian’s artworks.

A beautiful color blocked beige with yellow trench coat, worn by a young model. Image by Jigsaw.

Image by Jigsaw (via) Color blocked spring coat for SS18 (GBP 250.00)

However, there’s more to color blocking that meets the eye. Personally, I think it’s been around long before Mondrian, found in many parts of the world on exterior facades, i.e. Greece and Morocco. But because of him, people took notice and began praising it. They adopted its principle and elaborated it. Nowadays, it may be an on-off fashion trend, but it is also an interior design trend with a growing number of fans. The rules are more loose and the colors don’t have to match. It is the vibe’s outcome that’s of importance, that calls for out-of-the-box thinking and demands attention.

I have collected a number of images in order to show you how color blocking transforms spaces in a most unusual way. It is a great way to make a design statement in any space. Personally, I have used color blocking in most of my projects. I find it fascinating to give elements a color identity, not necessarily a loud one, but definitely one that’s not indifferent or boring, that later becomes part of an overall scheme. As a matter of fact I spend a considerable amount of time in composing these color fusions, but the result makes it all worthwhile. Moreover, allow me to mention that color blocked soft textiles and decor is another fabulous way to introduce this trend in an interior design.

Color blocked decor. A collage of three images depicting art images, color blocked cushion and a blanket throw. Images by Nest Co UK and Sainsbury's Home.

Images by Nest Co UK (1, 3) and Sainsbury’s Home (via)

A beautiful grey sofa looks extra fine in this moody interior with dark green and grey color blocking on the walls. Image by DFS Furniture.

Image by DFS furniture (via). A color blocked moody living room that allows the beautiful Eliza sofa to pop out.

A contemporary dining space with an interesting color scheme on the walls, complements the beautiful dining chairs. Image by Cuckooland.

Image by Cuckooland (via)

A feminine bright bedroom with pink, muted mauve, and mustard color blocked walls. Very stylish indeed. Image by Dunelm.

Image by Dunelm (via) A color blocked bedroom is always interesting.

A bright bedroom looking stunning due to a beam-column yellow blocking, an inky wall mural and a green pattern motif area rug. Image by Cuckooland.

Image by Cuckooland (via)

A stylish boudoir with pink and grey color blocking on the wall. Love the copper and brassy details of the furniture that add on a lux sense. Image by Dunelm.

Image by Dunelm (via)

What an awesome detail of a console table by a door window. Both the wall and the curtain are color blocked in muted terracotta shades. Very French. Image by Dunelm.

Image by Dunelm (via). A color blocked curtain to match the color blocked wall.

What do you think of it? I bet some of you are already wearing color blocked accessories or clothing. Some of you may have even introduced some decor in your home’s design. Therefore, why not consider going an extra mile and get creative… A child’s bedroom may be the ideal room to start experimenting with color blocking! 😉

XO,

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4 comments
  • Ioanna Savvaides March 10, 2018 at 10:05 am

    Really useful article with interesting pictures. I especially liked the photos by Cuckooland and Dunelm.

    • Thank you Ioanna! Color blocking does make things more interesting. Food for thought, right?! 😉 xo

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